Resumen




Myths and misconceptions regarding bariatric surgery


VOLUMEN 6 - NÚMERO 3 / Julio-Septiembre (Artículo Original)




Ariel Shuchleib Cung, Department of Surgery and the Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, American British Cowdray Medical Center, Mexico City, Mexico
Alberto Chousleb Kalach, Department of Surgery and the Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, American British Cowdray Medical Center, Mexico City, Mexico
Samuel Shuchleib Chaba, Department of Surgery and the Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, American British Cowdray Medical Center, Mexico City, Mexico
Moises Mercado Atri, Experimental Endocrinology Unit, Hospital de Especialidades, CMN, S.XXI, IMSS, Mexico City, Mexico


When properly indicated and performed by expert hands, the surgical management of obesity is the most effective means of achieving significant weight loss. Although the first report of a bariatric surgical procedure dates back to 1954, when Kremen described the jejunoileal bypass, it was not until 1967 when Mason first described the gastric bypass, based on his observations of weight loss after peptic ulcer surgery. Over the past 60 years, several bariatric surgical procedures have been developed. At present, the most commonly performed bariatric surgery in the U.S.A is the sleeve gastrectomy, whereas the Roux in Y gastric bypass is the most frequent procedure performed worldwide. Deciding which type of bariatric surgery should be performed in a particular patient can be a difficult task and should involve a multidisciplinary team that includes surgeons, endocrinologists, internists, nutrition specialists, and even psychologists or psychiatrists. The surgical treatment of obesity remains a rather controversial field. The purpose of this review was to clarify several myths and misconceptions regarding bariatric surgery, focusing specifically on sleeve gastrectomy, and the Roux in Y gastric bypass. 



Palabras clave: Obesity. Metabolic syndrome. Bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy. Gastric bypass.